Posts Tagged ‘Reduction’

Sound Reduction Solutions – Garage Band Practice

Any band must endure hours of practice in order to progress and take its talent to the next level. Amateur musicians are faced with an omnipresent catch 22 when it comes to band practice: where can I practice if I am an amateur and do not have access to a studio, and how can I develop my skills and reach a professional level without a place to practice? A major setback many amateur bands encounter is not having access to a suitable location where the group can practice without disturbing others. Quite often, the most practical go-to place for band practice is the garage of a home.

The typical garage structure does nothing to prevent noise transmission through its walls, or to facilitate quality acoustics within it. In fact, practicing music in a garage is not a far cry from practicing outside for all the community to hear. What’s more, most amateur musicians are not in the position to make costly renovations to their garages for sound reduction and acoustical improvement. Fortunately, a number of affordable temporary and easily implemented permanent garage soundproofing treatments are available to reduce sound transmission out of the garage while improving the quality of acoustics inside.

The extent of noise bleed, practicality and budget are common issues that contribute to determining the appropriate treatments to use in a garage setting. Reducing transmission of music throughout and outside of a home involves isolating the garage to contain noise reverberations within it. For a non-permanent fix, sound control curtains or blankets can be affixed to the walls around the garage and easily removed as necessary. Such temporary treatments are perfect solutions for bands that practice in multiple locations and for residents who rent their homes. A more permanent way to control sound bleed is to increase density and establish a disconnection from the existing garage wall by constructing a new wall layer. Increasing density and creating a separated wall surface is usually achieved by covering walls with a mass loaded vinyl and adding a second layer of drywall that extends from the original wall. Such a framing treatment causes sound waves to subside within the wall rather than traveling through the structure to adjoining rooms and outside. Garage doors present another sound transmission challenge with no concrete solution. However, used in combination with other sound reduction treatments, a sound control blanket covering the entire wall surface (not just the door) is an effective way to reduce sound transmission through a garage door.

Besides containing sound within the garage, musicians often want to take steps to improve the quality of acoustics within the garage. Corrugated sound control foam panels can be purchased in a variety of sizes and installed on the walls and ceilings of the garage to capture excess sound reflections and improve the quality of sound within the room. Additionally, the deep reverberations produced by bass instruments should be negated with treatments such as bass traps, which are designed to be installed in the corners of the room and capture vibrations. The absorption of sound by such panels improves the quality of sound inside the garage while reducing the pressure within that would otherwise escape into the home and outdoors.

Additional provisions, such as elevating a platform for drums or investing in a drum shield can provide increased sound control and acoustical enhancement. Since a number of factors can influence the degree of sound reduction treatments needed for effectiveness within a garage, it is best to consult with a soundproofing professional who can recommend solutions for the unique challenges of your application.

About the Author: Mark Rustad is President of NetWell Noise Control, based in Minneapolis, MN. Founded in 1991, NetWell is a leading supplier of soundproofing products, sound reduction treatments, and online acoustical consulting services. NetWell?s sound management skills are packaged into the industry?s premier website. Discover first hand why so much of NetWell?s business stems from the referrals and repeat orders they receive from satisfied clients around the world.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 12, 2010 at 3:48 am

Categories: Audio   Tags: , , , , ,

Sound Absorption and the Noise Reduction Coefficient (nrc)

When sound waves travel through air and encounter another medium, the wall of a room, for instance, a portion of the sound will be absorbed by the wall while the remainder will reflect from the wall surface. Add to the mix the other surfaces reflecting sound waves in various directions within the room, and the result is a jumble of sound reflections which interfere with the clarity of the original, intended sound. The presence of numerous hard, untreated surfaces is often to blame for the heightened noise levels in busy restaurants as the voices of multiple patrons reflect and produce background noise. Acoustical improvement and sound reduction projects often involve the implementation of treatments designed to absorb sound wave reflections as a part of a comprehensive sound control plan.

Taking into consideration the tendency of sound waves to reflect from surfaces, it is apparent why the absorption of sound reflections is an important element of sound control and acoustical improvement. Capturing sound reflections becomes particularly important in environments such as auditoriums, restaurants and places of worship, where the quality of acoustics experienced within an area is fundamental to its purpose.

The reflective tendencies of the particular surfaces present within a room may contribute to the type and extent of sound absorption treatment necessary to achieve the desired result. Carpet, for instance, is more absorptive than tile, so a carpeted floor would produce less significant sound reflection than would a tile floor with other factors constant. How do we know? By performing the standard ASTM C423 test, independent labs quantify the amount of sound a particular surface material absorbs and assigns to it a value referred to as the Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC). The NRC, calculated based on testing of a material at various frequencies within a concrete enclosure, can be interpreted as a percentage of noise that is captured and converted by a surface while the remaining portion is reflected. A NRC of 0.44, for instance, would be assigned to a surface which on average absorbs 44% of sound while reflecting the remaining 54%.

Like materials used in construction, soundproofing products are also tested for sound absorption at various frequencies and assigned a Noise Reduction Coefficient. The absorptive value exhibited by a particular sound treatment can help determine the circumstances in which the treatment should be applied. A project aimed at controlling low bass tones, for example, would call for more absorptive treatments than one targeting the higher frequencies produced by the human voice. Since each acoustical improvement solution must be tailored based on characteristics of the targeted area and frequencies to be controlled, it is advised to consult with a knowledgeable soundproofing consultant prior to implementing sound reduction treatments in order to ensure that critical variables are addressed.

About the Author: Mark Rustad is President of NetWell Noise Control, based in Minneapolis, MN. Founded in 1991, NetWell is a leading supplier of acoustic products, soundproofing treatments, sound reduction products and online acoustical consulting services. NetWell?s sound management skills are packaged into the industry?s premier website. Discover first hand why so much of NetWell?s business stems from the referrals and repeat orders they receive from satisfied clients around the world.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - March 10, 2010 at 7:56 am

Categories: Audio   Tags: , , , ,

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