Posts Tagged ‘Tape’

Which Is Best – Audio Tape, CD or Audio Download?

Despite how great CDs are, many people still prefer audiocassettes to them, especially when it comes to listening to audio books.


Below are some of the reasons why:


One, Audio books in a CD format cannot contain more than 75 minutes of content but audiocassettes can hold as much as 90 whole minutes (and, in many cases much more) of narration.


I agree you can have the entire audio book spread out in several CDs, but not many people like to carry around too many CDs.


So, while you might need just a few audiocassettes for a particular audio book, you will probably need many more CDs for that same audio book.


Two, most people don’t like to spend extra cash buying CD audio books when they can get the same audio book cheaper in audiocassettes.


For example, while an unabridged version of “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” on 12 audiotapes can be bought for just $31.96 on the Barnes & Noble website, the CD format from Barnes & Noble costs almost double that amount – exactly $55.96 for 17 sets of CDs!


Of course, its not that they want to rip you off – it’s simply because it costs much more to produce CDs than it does to produce audiocassettes.


Three, when you turn off your CD player while listening to an audio book, you won’t be able to resume from the particular spot you left off. With a cassette, you can begin from the exact same spot you left off.


With CDs it can be frustrating when driving because each time you turn off your car, it would mean restarting the audio book or trying to locate exactly where you stopped.


Of course there are modern and more advanced CD players that can now save your location when you turn off your car, thereby allowing you to resume at the exact same spot you left off.


This won’t work when you turn off the car AND take out the CD. But it will work with an audiocassette!


Four, because audio books are mainly just narration, many users don’t see why they should spend the extra money to buy CDs because of issues of recording quality when they can get near enough the same quality with audiocassettes.


Their argument is that if it was sound ‘quality’ they wanted, they would go for audio books in CD formats, but sound quality is the same with audiocassettes and CDs when it comes to audio books.


In more succinct terms – the voice of humans (without drums and other musical paraphernalia) has very little to gain from the depth and clarity that comes with digital recordings in CD format!


Things are changing though. With the development of compact playes such as iPods and MP3 players, it’s little wonder that downloadable audio books are fast outpacing the traditional audio tape or CD as the preferred medium. After all, one can always make a ‘hard’ (CD copy) of a digitally downloaded audio book if one so wished thereby having the best of both worlds.

Eddie Lamb provides an abundance of information on a range of topical subjects. With the amount of information now available to the discerning researcher, we believe a better understanding your area of interest helps your decision making process immensely. You’ll find a host of useful information about digital downloadable products at Digital Audios Direct.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - May 23, 2011 at 8:44 am

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How to Create a Podcast From Audio Tape

How To Create Podcast Media From Audio TapeThe digital revolution has rendered many of to a state of utter confusion when it comes to dealing with older/analog audio technologies. A good number of us are still utilizing the familiar old tape deck to record our audio, but then become absolutely befuddled when it comes time to transfer that audio into the digital environment. I always get this picture in my head of my clients standing there with RCA audio cables – staring blankly at their computer – wondering how to get the audio from the source to the destination.This tutorial is meant to help out those confused masses. I will preface the tutorial by saying that this is by no means the ideal way to create podcast media. However, people should stick to what they’re comfortable with. If that’s audio tape – then by all means – go for it! Maybe someday you’ll invest in a good MP3 recording device – but until then – it’s no biggie.So – let’s get started.Equipment/Hardware Needed

Standard Audio Cassette Player. I highly recommend using a good quality walkman – for it has the ideal output port on it built in. I do not recommend using your home stereo cassette deck for this procedure – because your deck most likely has either RCA outs (absolutely no good) and a 1/4″ plug (if you’re lucky.)
A 1/8″ to 1/8″ Mini Plug connector. You know the little plug connector that’s at the end of your headphones? This cable has two of those – one on each end. You can purchase these cables at pretty much any electronics store. (If you must use your home stereo deck – and if it comes with a 1/4″ plug jack – you can probably find a 1/4″ to 1/8″ adapter along with the cord.)
Good sound card for your computer with an “line in” jack (looks just like the audio out jack . If you’ve purchased your computer within the last few years – you most likely already have an audio card sufficient for this process.) Familiarize yourself with the location of the card, and find the “line in” jack.Software Needed

Audio Recording Software with noise-reduction filters. I recommend Audacity – as it’s free and pretty simple to use.Once you have all of the equipment, it’s time to get started.Transferring the audio from Tape to ComputerStep 1:Connect the tape deck to the computer by plugging one end of the connector cable into the headphones jack of the walkman, and the other end of the connector cable into the “line in” jack of your computer’s sound card.Step 2:Install your audio processing software (Audacity.)Step 3:Launch Audacity, and look for the input pulldown menu. It’s on the top right of the screen. Click the tab and select “Line In”.Step 4:Adjust the volume of your walkman to be medium/low. Rewind the tape and press Play.Step 5:Press “Record” in Audacity’s interface and check the levels of the audio being brought in. If the levels are too high (hot) your audio will be distorted. You will know if the audio is “hot” by if the levels trip too far to the right. If so, either adjust the volume from the walkman, or the audio input levels in the software to compensate.Step 6:After finding the perfect recording level, you’re ready. Rewind the tape again. Press “record” in audacity, and press “play” on your walkman.Step 7:Review your audio. If you’re happy with it, save it, and begin to tweak it with the noise reduction software.Step 8:Save your audio file as .mp3 format.You’re done!Now your audio is ready to be included/posted to your podcast.If you need a good podcast host I recommend AvMyPodcast.com. They have unmetered bandwidth, great tech support, and a lot of tutorials to teach you how to make a podcast.Good luck!

John Pritchard is the happy father of two daughters, living in Charlotte, NC.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by admin - December 20, 2009 at 5:08 pm

Categories: Audio   Tags: , , , ,

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